Profound Sadness
things i like
that i think you might like as well.
Profound Sadness
Ello | hellolobo
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lindahall:

Sébastien Le Clerc - Scientist of the Day
Sébastien Le Clerc, a French engraver, was born Sep. 26, 1637. Shortly after Louis XIV established the Royal Academy of Sciences in Paris in 1666, Le Clerc was appointed engraver to the king, and thus he fell into the position of illustrating the work of the Academy in its scientific publications. When Claude Perrault embarked on the ambitious program of dissecting and analyzing the exotic animals in the King’s menagerie (see yesterday’s Scientist of the Day), it was Le Clerc who did all the drawings and engravings for the published work (see images from yesterday, and the tortoise above). He also designed the headpieces, tailpieces, and decorated initials for the book, Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux (1676). One of his most famous engravings, which appears as a frontispiece in the Memoires, shows King Louis XIV visiting the Academy, an event that had not yet occurred when Le Clerc conceived the scene in 1671 (see first image above).
Le Clerc was also professor of geometry and perspective at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, and he wrote several textbooks on geometry and perspective, illustrated with his own engravings, which we have in the Library. The two illustrations above are taken from his Pratique de la geometrie (1682), and seldom have lessons in Euclid looked so good.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
lindahall:

Sébastien Le Clerc - Scientist of the Day
Sébastien Le Clerc, a French engraver, was born Sep. 26, 1637. Shortly after Louis XIV established the Royal Academy of Sciences in Paris in 1666, Le Clerc was appointed engraver to the king, and thus he fell into the position of illustrating the work of the Academy in its scientific publications. When Claude Perrault embarked on the ambitious program of dissecting and analyzing the exotic animals in the King’s menagerie (see yesterday’s Scientist of the Day), it was Le Clerc who did all the drawings and engravings for the published work (see images from yesterday, and the tortoise above). He also designed the headpieces, tailpieces, and decorated initials for the book, Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux (1676). One of his most famous engravings, which appears as a frontispiece in the Memoires, shows King Louis XIV visiting the Academy, an event that had not yet occurred when Le Clerc conceived the scene in 1671 (see first image above).
Le Clerc was also professor of geometry and perspective at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, and he wrote several textbooks on geometry and perspective, illustrated with his own engravings, which we have in the Library. The two illustrations above are taken from his Pratique de la geometrie (1682), and seldom have lessons in Euclid looked so good.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
lindahall:

Sébastien Le Clerc - Scientist of the Day
Sébastien Le Clerc, a French engraver, was born Sep. 26, 1637. Shortly after Louis XIV established the Royal Academy of Sciences in Paris in 1666, Le Clerc was appointed engraver to the king, and thus he fell into the position of illustrating the work of the Academy in its scientific publications. When Claude Perrault embarked on the ambitious program of dissecting and analyzing the exotic animals in the King’s menagerie (see yesterday’s Scientist of the Day), it was Le Clerc who did all the drawings and engravings for the published work (see images from yesterday, and the tortoise above). He also designed the headpieces, tailpieces, and decorated initials for the book, Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux (1676). One of his most famous engravings, which appears as a frontispiece in the Memoires, shows King Louis XIV visiting the Academy, an event that had not yet occurred when Le Clerc conceived the scene in 1671 (see first image above).
Le Clerc was also professor of geometry and perspective at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, and he wrote several textbooks on geometry and perspective, illustrated with his own engravings, which we have in the Library. The two illustrations above are taken from his Pratique de la geometrie (1682), and seldom have lessons in Euclid looked so good.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
lindahall:

Sébastien Le Clerc - Scientist of the Day
Sébastien Le Clerc, a French engraver, was born Sep. 26, 1637. Shortly after Louis XIV established the Royal Academy of Sciences in Paris in 1666, Le Clerc was appointed engraver to the king, and thus he fell into the position of illustrating the work of the Academy in its scientific publications. When Claude Perrault embarked on the ambitious program of dissecting and analyzing the exotic animals in the King’s menagerie (see yesterday’s Scientist of the Day), it was Le Clerc who did all the drawings and engravings for the published work (see images from yesterday, and the tortoise above). He also designed the headpieces, tailpieces, and decorated initials for the book, Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux (1676). One of his most famous engravings, which appears as a frontispiece in the Memoires, shows King Louis XIV visiting the Academy, an event that had not yet occurred when Le Clerc conceived the scene in 1671 (see first image above).
Le Clerc was also professor of geometry and perspective at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, and he wrote several textbooks on geometry and perspective, illustrated with his own engravings, which we have in the Library. The two illustrations above are taken from his Pratique de la geometrie (1682), and seldom have lessons in Euclid looked so good.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
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twinpeakscaptioned:

you know what day it is.
twinpeakscaptioned:

you know what day it is.
twinpeakscaptioned:

you know what day it is.
twinpeakscaptioned:

you know what day it is.
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nihilocrat:

el láser verde
nihilocrat:

el láser verde
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dragonitedelight:

Gengar Family + Pokémon TCG - ★|☆
dragonitedelight:

Gengar Family + Pokémon TCG - ★|☆
dragonitedelight:

Gengar Family + Pokémon TCG - ★|☆
dragonitedelight:

Gengar Family + Pokémon TCG - ★|☆
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fuckyeahampworship:

thewintercurse:

Celestion g12-65 loaded V4 cab under my ‘68 Sound City 100. Jeezie Creezie.

ilu
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one-swoodguy:


Rina Takeda [x]


SonI’m in love
one-swoodguy:


Rina Takeda [x]


SonI’m in love
one-swoodguy:


Rina Takeda [x]


SonI’m in love
one-swoodguy:


Rina Takeda [x]


SonI’m in love
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